2015 World Championships

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The 2015 Pokémon World Championships were held at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts from August 21 to 23, 2015. It was the twelfth invitation-only championships for players of the Pokémon Trading Card Game, as well as the seventh for players of the Pokémon video games. It was the first time that Boston held the event, and the second consecutive time the event was held in the Eastern United States, the previous event being held in Washington, D.C.

For the first time, there were no Last Chance Qualifiers held at the event. Instead, the tournament was played over three days: a preliminary tournament on Friday, the main tournament on Saturday, and all finals being played on Sunday.

Trading Card Game Championships

The Pokémon Trading Card Game featured the 2014-15 Standard format, using all cards from Boundaries Crossed onward. Players were able to receive invitations from outstanding performances at their country's National Championships, the previous year's World Championships, or through the number of Championship Points they obtained throughout the year.

The first day of the tournament featured a preliminary tournament for all World Championship qualifiers who did not earn an automatic invitation to day two. Players who earned enough match points during swiss rounds joined the automatic qualifiers on day two. The second day of the tournament featured a series of swiss rounds in each division. At the end of swiss rounds, the top eight players in each division were seeded into single-elimination tournaments, with the finals being played on Sunday, to determine each division's World Champion.

Junior Division

Haruto Kobayashi of Japan was the defending champion in the Junior Division. Haruto played in the Seniors Division, placing 97th on Day Two.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Yuto Omur    
8  Alejandro Ng-Guzman    
    8  Alejandro Ng-Guzman    
    4  Enrico Marini    
5  Keita Soubaigne  
4  Enrico Marini    
    8  Alejandro Ng-Guzman  
    3  Rowan Stavenow  
3  Rowan Stavenow    
6  Asaki Hasegawa    
    3  Rowan Stavenow  
    7  Jackson Davies    
7  Jackson Davies  
2  Everett Rutter-Ferris    



Senior Division

Trent Orndorff of the United States was the defending champion. Trent played in the Masters Division in 2015.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Colter Decker    
8  Jon Eng    
    1  Colter Decker    
    5  Patrick Martinez    
5  Patrick Martinez  
4  Cal Connor    
    5  Patrick Martinez  
    2  Jeffrey Cheng  
3  Brent Tonisson    
6  Jesper Eriksen    
    3  Brent Tonisson  
    2  Jeffrey Cheng    
7  Josh Fernando  
2  Jeffrey Cheng    



Masters Division

Andrew Estrada of Canada was the defending champion. In 2014, Andrew defeated Igor Costa, the 2012 TCG Masters Champion, in the final. Andrew withdrew from the Day Two tournament after four rounds.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Mees Brenninkmeijer    
8  Tito Santoso    
    1  Mees Brenninkmeijer    
    5  Igor Costa    
5  Simon Narode  
4  Igor Costa    
    1  Mees Brenninkmeijer  
    6  Jacob Van Wagner  
3  Martin Janou    
6  Jacob Van Wagner    
    6  Jacob Van Wagner  
    7  Merlin Quittek    
7  Merlin Quittek  
2  Sean Foisy    




Video Game Championships

The first day of the tournament featured a preliminary tournament for all World Championship qualifiers who did not earn an automatic invitation to day two. Players who earned enough match points during swiss rounds joined the automatic qualifiers on day two. The second day of the tournament featured a series of swiss rounds in each division. At the end of swiss rounds, the top eight players in each division were seeded into single-elimination tournaments, with the finals being played on Sunday, to determine each division's World Champion.

Participants used Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. All matches were conducted via Double Battles and any Pokémon in the National Pokédex were able to be entered, provided they had a blue pentagon in the their summary screen, with the exception of Mewtwo, Mew, Lugia, Ho-Oh, Celebi, Kyogre, Groudon, Rayquaza, Jirachi, Deoxys, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina, Phione, Manaphy, Darkrai, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Reshiram, Zekrom, Kyurem, Keldeo, Meloetta, Genesect, Xerneas, Yveltal, Zygarde, and Diancie.

Similar to Flat Battle mode, Pokémon of levels 51 and above were temporarily reduced to level 50, while Pokémon level 50 and below would retain their levels. Held items could be used, but no two Pokémon from the same team could hold the same item. Players were not allowed to change their held items after they had registered. Players were allowed to change teams after Friday's preliminary tournament, if they advanced to Saturday.

Junior Division

Kota Yamamoto of Japan was the defending champion. Kota played in the Senior Division in 2015, finishing 33rd on Day Two.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Ryan Jaehyun Park    
8  Yuma Yoshida    
    1  Ryan Jaehyun Park    
    5  Shu Harsaki    
5  Shu Harasaki  
4  London Swan    
    1  Ryan Jaehyun Park  
    7  Kotone Yasue  
3  Aiden McKinney    
6  Shuhei Tsukano    
    6  Shuhei Tsukano  
    7  Kotone Yasue    
7  Kotone Yasue  
2  Cory Connor    



Senior Division

Nikolai Zielinski of the United States was the defending champion, but is eligible for the Masters Division in 2015.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  David Koutesh    
8  Mark McQuillan    
    8  Mark McQuillan    
    5  Kylie Chua    
5  Kylie Chua  
4  Chien-Chien Tsai    
    8  Mark McQuillan  
    3  Koki Honda  
3  Max Marjanovic    
6  Sebastian Escalante    
    3  Max Marjanovic  
    2  Koki Honda    
7  Jake Skurchak  
2  Koki Honda    



Masters Division

Se Jun Park of South Korea was the defending champion. Se Jun Park is the only Korean player to win the Pokémon Video Game World Championships in any division.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Yosuke Isagi    
8  Lajos Woltersdorf    
    1  Yosuke Isagi    
    4  Hideyuki Taida    
5  Daichi Kumabe  
4  Hideyuki Taida    
    4  Hideyuki Taida  
    6  Shoma Honami  
3  Daiki Moriyama    
6  Shoma Honami    
    6  Shoma Honami  
    2  Naohito Mizobuchi    
7  Hayato Takahashi  
2  Naohito Mizobuchi    



Pokkén Tournament Invitational

Along with the surprise announcement of Pokkén Tournament's localization and Wii U port, an invitational tournament was also held on the first day of 2015 World Championships. Famous players from the fighting game community, along with previous champions of the Video Game and Trading Card Game Championships were invited to compete. The double elimination format was adopted. Rip was the winner of the tournament, with Justin Wong being the runner-up.

Winners Bracket

Round Player 1 Pokémon Player 2 Pokémon Result
1 Justin Wong Weavile Jason K. Gardevoir 2-0
1 HugS Machamp NYC Fab Charizard 1-2
1 Tasty Steve Blaziken Se Jun Park Suicune 1-2
1 Spooky Suicune Rip Pikachu 0-2
2 NYC Fab Charizard Justin Wong Weavile 0-2
2 Rip Pikachu Se Jun Park Suicune 2-0
Final Rip Pikachu Justin Wong Weavile 2-1

Losers Bracket

Round Player 1 Pokémon Player 2 Pokémon Result
1 HugS Machamp Jason K. Gardevoir 2-0
1 Spooky Suicune Tasty Steve Blaziken 0-2
2 HugS Machamp Se Jun Park Suicune 2-1
2 Tasty Steve Blaziken NYC Fab Charizard 1-2
3 HugS Machamp NYC Fab Charizard 1-2
Final NYC Fab Charizard Justin Wong Weavile 0-2

Grand Finals

Round Player 1 Pokémon Player 2 Pokémon Result
Reset Rip Pikachu Justin Wong Weavile 0-2
Final Rip Pikachu Justin Wong Weavile 2-0

Event Pokémon

#319 Sharpedo /
  Level 50  
Type:
Water Dark
Ability: Speed Boost
Held item:   Sharpedonite
ID: 08215
OT: WORLD15
Met: Worlds 2015 (fateful encounter)
Nature: Adamant
Ribbon:   Event Ribbon
Aqua Jet
Water Physical
Crunch
Dark Physical
Ice Fang
Ice Physical
Destiny Bond
Ghost Status
Games Method Region Location Duration
ORAS local wireless all 2015 World Championships, Boston, United States August 21 to 23, 2015
Moves in bold can be taught again at the Move Reminder as a special move if forgotten.
Date received is the receiving system's date when the Wonder Card is received.
This Pokémon is set to the same language as the game that received it.


Pokémon World Championships
Pokémon Trading Card Game only 2004-2008; TCG and Video Games 2009-on
2004: Blaziken TechMagma SpiritRocky BeachTeam Rushdown
2005: Bright AuraDark TyranitarKing of the WestQueendom
2006: B-L-SEeveelutionsMewtrickSuns & Moons
2007: FlyveesLegendary AscentRamboltSwift Empoleon
2008: Bliss ControlEmpotechIntimidationPsychic Lock
2009: StallgonCrowned TigerQueengarLuxdrill
2010: LuxChomp of the SpiritHappy LuckPower CottonweedBoltevoir
2011: MegazoneReshiphlosionThe TruthTwinboar
2012: Pesadelo PrismTerraki-MewtwoEeltwoCMT
2013: Anguille Sous RocheAmerican GothicDarkraiUltimate Team Plasma
2014: Plasma PowerTrevgorEmerald KingCrazy Punch
2015: The Flying HammerPunches 'n' BitesHonorStoisePrimal Groudon
2016: Black DragonBebe DeckMagical SymphonyNinja Blitz
2017: Infinite ForceGolisodorIce Path FTWSamurai Sniper
2018: Victory MapDragones y SombrasGarbanetteBuzzroc
2019: Pikarom JudgeFire BoxMind BlownPerfection
2021:
Champions Jason KlaczynskiJun HasebeRay Rizzo


  This article is part of both Project TCG and Project Games, Bulbapedia projects that, together, aim to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon Trading Card Game and Video Game Championship Tournaments.