2016 World Championships

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The 2016 Pokémon World Championships was held at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis in San Francisco, California in the United States from August 19 to 21, 2016. It was the thirteenth invitation-only championships for players of the Pokémon Trading Card Game, as well as the eighth for players of the Pokémon video games. In addition, it is also the second event to host a Pokkén Tournament competition (and the first to have it announced in advance). It is the first time that San Francisco has hosted the event.

Like the previous year's event, there was no Last Chance Qualifiers for either the Trading Card Game or the video games at the event. Instead, players who earned enough Championship Points during the preceding season had the opportunity to enter the tournaments on either Friday or Saturday, depending on the amount of Championship Points received. The Pokkén Tournament Championships, on the other hand, held Last Chance Qualifiers on Friday.

Trading Card Game Championships

The Pokémon Trading Card Game featured the 2015-16 Standard format, using all cards from XY onward. Players were able to receive invitations from outstanding performances at their country's National Championships, the previous year's World Championships, or through the number of Championship Points they obtained throughout the year.

The first day of the tournament featured a preliminary tournament for all World Championship qualifiers who did not earn an automatic invitation to day two. Players who earned enough match points during Swiss rounds joined the automatic qualifiers on day two. The second day of the tournament featured a series of Swiss rounds in each division. At the end of Swiss rounds, the top eight players in each division were seeded into single-elimination tournaments, with the finals being played on Sunday, to determine each division's World Champion.

Junior Division

Rowan Stavenow of Canada was the defending champion in the Junior Division. Rowan became eligible for the Senior Division in 2016, and earned an invitation to Day Two where he finished 84th.

Shunto Sadahiro of Japan became the new World Champion with a record of 8-0-2.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Enrico Marini    
8  Riku Ushirosako    
    8  Riku Ushirosako    
    5  Yuta Ozawa    
5  Yuta Ozawa  
4  Asaki Hasegawa    
    8  Riku Ushirosako  
    6  Shunto Sadahiro  
3  Christian Moreno    
6  Shunto Sadahiro    
    6  Shunto Sadahiro  
    2  Roan Godfrey-Robbins    
7  Kai Abe  
2  Roan Godfrey-Robbins    



Senior Division

Patrick Martinez of the United States was the defending champion. Martinez earned an invitation to Day Two, where he finished in the Top 16.

Jesper Eriksen of Denmark became the first Danish World Champion, finishing with a final record of 9–1.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Jesper Eriksen    
8  Tanner Hurley    
    1  Jesper Eriksen    
    5  Raphael Souto    
5  Raphael Souto  
4  Spencer Perez-Dormitzer    
    1  Jesper Eriksen  
    2  Connor Pederson  
3  Attar Ricco    
6  Calvin Connor    
    3  Calvin Connor  
    2  Connor Pederson    
7  Kim Hyeok  
2  Connor Pedersen    



Masters Division

Jacob Van Wagner of the United States was the defending champion, but finished 59th in Friday's tournament (Day One).

Shintaro Ito of Japan became the new World Champion with a final record of 9–1.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Bert Wolters    
8  Ross Cawthon    
    8  Ross Cawthon    
    4  Cody Walinski    
5  Brad Curcio  
4  Cody Walinski    
    4  Cody Walinski  
    2  Shintaro Ito  
3  Samuel Hough    
6  Luca Schuster    
    3  Samuel Hough  
    2  Shintaro Ito    
7  Gustavo Wada  
2  Shintaro Ito    



Video Game Championships

The first day of the tournament featured a preliminary tournament for all World Championship qualifiers who did not earn an automatic invitation to day two. Players with two or fewer losses during swiss rounds joined the automatic qualifiers on day two. Unlike in previous tournaments, players' match records were not carried over from Friday, and players were not forced to use the same team as on Friday. Players with no more than two losses (and no ties) competed in single-elimination rounds late Saturday. The top eight players in each division were seeded into single-elimination tournaments, with the finals being played on Sunday, to determine each division's World Champion.

This year, matches were Double Battles using Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. Any Pokémon in the National Pokédex were eligible, except Mythical Pokémon. Unlike previous years, up to two special Pokémon could be used. All Pokémon were required to have a blue pentagon.

Similar to Flat Battle mode, Pokémon of Levels 51 and above were temporarily reduced to Level 50, while Pokémon Level 50 and below retained their levels. Held items except for Soul Dew could be used, but no two Pokémon from the same team could hold the same held items. Players were not allowed to change their held items after they had registered, and could only use items from within the game and those received at an official Pokémon event or promotion. Players were allowed to change teams after Friday's preliminary tournament.

Junior Division

Kotone Yasue of Japan was the defending champion but was eligible for the Seniors Division this year. The 18 players who finished with two or fewer losses in Saturday's tournament were invited to the single-elimination rounds.

Cory Connor of the United States, who finished in the Top 8 the previous year, became the new Junior Division World Champion.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Rikuto Noda    
8  Chang Joon Seo    
    1  Rikuto Noda    
    12  Cory Connor    
12  Cory Connor  
4  Corey Yuen    
    12  Cory Connor  
    11  Shu Harasaki  
3  Kaisei Ichikawa    
11  Shu Harasaki    
    11  Shu Harasaki  
    2  Enzo Reci    
10  Parker Hurley  
2  Enzo Reci    



Senior Division

Mark McQuillan of the United Kingdom was the defending champion. McQuillan became eligible for the Masters Division in 2016. The 16 players who finished with two or fewer losses in Saturday's tournament were invited to the single-elimination rounds.

Carson Confer of the United States became the new World Champion.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
16  Carson Confer    
9  Nils Dunlop    
    16  Carson Confer    
    4  Mostafa Afr    
5  Daravone Souphommanychanh  
4  Mostafa Afr    
    16  Carson Confer  
    11  Yuki Wata  
3  Hong Ju Young    
11  Yuki Wata    
    11  Yuki Wata  
    7  Kazuki Ogushi    
7  Kazuki Ogushi  
15  Brendan Zheng    



Masters Division

Shoma Honami of Japan was the defending champion. The 24 players who finished with two or fewer losses in Saturday's tournament were invited to the single-elimination rounds.

On his sixth consecutive visit to Worlds, including being runner-up at the 2012 World Championships, Wolfe Glick of the United States won the Masters Division Video Game World Championship.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Aaron Traylor    
9  Markus Stadter    
    9  Markus Stadter    
    5  Wolfe Glick    
4  Justin Carris  
5  Wolfe Glick    
    5  Wolfe Glick  
    19  Johnathan Evans  
18  Eduardo Cunha    
23  Baris Akcos    
    18  Eduardo Cunha  
    19  Johnathan Evans    
19  Johnathan Evans  
6  Barry Anderson    



Pokkén Tournament Championships

Unlike the surprise Pokkén Tournament invitational competition at last year's event, invitations for the first Pokkén Tournament World Championships were won at various tournaments held throughout the year or through accumulating enough Championship Points. The Pokkén Tournament Championship Series has only two age divisions, Seniors and Masters, as opposed to the three used by the TCG and video game tournaments. A strict limit of players per division was placed upon the Championships, only allowing 64 Masters Division players and 16 Seniors Division players. Of those players, only 43 from the Masters and 8 from the Seniors received invitations; the North American and European regions had 18 Masters and 4 Seniors invitations each, while Japan had 7 Masters invitations (an eighth was given but the player did not attend Worlds). All remaining slots were given to those who qualified through the Last Chance Qualifiers.

Invitations were given to the winners, and in select cases runners-up, of various tournaments throughout the year. Several were sanctioned independent tournaments, including: DreamHack events held in Austin, Texas and Jönköping, Sweden; St. Louis Showdown held in Collinsville, Illinois; CEO 2016 held in Orlando, Florida; and EVO 2016 held in Las Vegas, Nevada. Invitational tournaments were also held at the US Spring Regionals and the National Championships of Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

The tournament was the double elimination format. Top 16 sets and below were best two out of three games, while Top 8 sets and above were best three out of five. All games were played on Ferrum Stadium.

Seniors Division

Josh "woomy!gun" Simmonite of the United Kingdom beat Dale "Bolimar" Causey of the United States to become the first Pokkén Tournament Seniors Division World Champion.

Winners Semifinals   Winners Final   Grand Final   Reset
Blaziken  Wayland Lindsay    
Lucario  Bolimar       Lucario  Bolimar    
Pikachu Libre  (EZ$) Jaxob     Charizard  woomy!gun       Charizard  woomy!gun     Charizard  woomy!gun  
Charizard  woomy!gun       Lucario  Bolimar     Lucario  Bolimar  
Losers Quarterfinals   Losers Semifinal   Losers Final
Blaziken  Wayland Lindsay       Lucario  Bolimar  
Pikachu  A-aron     Blaziken  Wayland Lindsay       Blaziken  Wayland Lindsay  
Pikachu Libre  (EZ$) Jaxob     Suicune  Galactasaur    
Suicune  Galactasaur    

Masters Division

Masami "Potetin" Sato of Japan beat Takuma "Azazel" Araki of Japan to become the first Pokkén Tournament Masters Division World Champion.

Winners Semifinals   Winners Final   Grand Final   Reset
Machamp  Azazel    
Sceptile  Teejay       Machamp  Azazel    
Lucario  Deity Light     Weavile  Potetin       Machamp  Azazel     Machamp  Azazel  
Mewtwo  Potetin       Mewtwo/Chandelure  Potetin     Chandelure  Potetin  
Losers Quarterfinals   Losers Semifinal   Losers Final
Sceptile  Teejay       Mewtwo  Potetin  
Suicune  Buntan       Sceptile  Teejay       Lucario  Deity Light  
Lucario  Deity Light     Lucario  Deity Light    
Mewtwo  Tanoshimi    

Event Pokémon

Bulbasaur

#001 Bulbasaur /
  Level 5  
Type:
Grass Poison
Ability: Chlorophyll
Held item:   Venusaurite
ID: 08196
OT: WORLDS16
Met: WCS 2016 (fateful encounter)
Nature: Random
Ribbon:   Event Ribbon
Tackle
Normal Physical
Growl
Normal Status
Celebrate
Normal Status
--
None None
Games Method Region Location Duration
ORAS local wireless all 2016 World Championships, San Francisco, United States August 19 to 21, 2016
Moves in bold can be taught again at the Move Reminder as a special move if forgotten.
Date received is the receiving system's date when the Wonder Card is received.
This Pokémon is set to the same language as the game that received it.

Charmander

#004 Charmander /
  Level 5  
Type:
Fire Unknown
Ability: Solar Power
Held item:   Charizardite X
ID: 08196
OT: WORLDS16
Met: WCS 2016 (fateful encounter)
Nature: Random
Ribbon:   Event Ribbon
Scratch
Normal Physical
Growl
Normal Status
Celebrate
Normal Status
--
None None
Games Method Region Location Duration
ORAS local wireless all 2016 World Championships, San Francisco, United States August 19 to 21, 2016
Moves in bold can be taught again at the Move Reminder as a special move if forgotten.
Date received is the receiving system's date when the Wonder Card is received.
This Pokémon is set to the same language as the game that received it.

Squirtle

#007 Squirtle /
  Level 5  
Type:
Water Unknown
Ability: Rain Dish
Held item:   Blastoisinite
ID: 08196
OT: WORLDS16
Met: WCS 2016 (fateful encounter)
Nature: Random
Ribbon:   Event Ribbon
Tackle
Normal Physical
Tail Whip
Normal Status
Celebrate
Normal Status
--
None None
Games Method Region Location Duration
ORAS local wireless all 2016 World Championships, San Francisco, United States August 19 to 21, 2016
Moves in bold can be taught again at the Move Reminder as a special move if forgotten.
Date received is the receiving system's date when the Wonder Card is received.
This Pokémon is set to the same language as the game that received it.

External links


Pokémon World Championships
Pokémon Trading Card Game only 2004-2008; TCG and Video Games 2009-on
2004: Blaziken TechMagma SpiritRocky BeachTeam Rushdown
2005: Bright AuraDark TyranitarKing of the WestQueendom
2006: B-L-SEeveelutionsMewtrickSuns & Moons
2007: FlyveesLegendary AscentRamboltSwift Empoleon
2008: Bliss ControlEmpotechIntimidationPsychic Lock
2009: StallgonCrowned TigerQueengarLuxdrill
2010: LuxChomp of the SpiritHappy LuckPower CottonweedBoltevoir
2011: MegazoneReshiphlosionThe TruthTwinboar
2012: Pesadelo PrismTerraki-MewtwoEeltwoCMT
2013: Anguille Sous RocheAmerican GothicDarkraiUltimate Team Plasma
2014: Plasma PowerTrevgorEmerald KingCrazy Punch
2015: The Flying HammerPunches 'n' BitesHonorStoisePrimal Groudon
2016: Black DragonBebe DeckMagical SymphonyNinja Blitz
2017: Infinite ForceGolisodorIce Path FTWSamurai Sniper
2018: Victory MapDragones y SombrasGarbanetteBuzzroc
2019: Pikarom JudgeFire BoxMind BlownPerfection
2021:
Champions Jason KlaczynskiJun HasebeRay Rizzo


  This article is part of both Project TCG and Project Games, Bulbapedia projects that, together, aim to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon Trading Card Game and Video Game Championship Tournaments.