Pokémon Garden

This article is about the Flash browser game. For the town in Mystery Dungeon for WiiWare, see Pokémon Garden (Mystery Dungeon).
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Pokémon Garden (Japanese: ポケモンガーデン Pokémon Garden) was a social Flash-based web browser game, developed by Bascule and released exclusively on the website Yahoo! Kids Japan. The game essentially acted as a virtual theme park, where players could chat with each other, play mini-games, schedule rides on the "Pokémon Special Tour" attraction, and see previews for Pokémon Diamond and Pearl Versions, which would launch 2 months after Garden.

Pokémon Garden
ポケモンガーデン
Garden exterior.png
Screenshot of the main building's exterior
Basic info
Platform: Browser based Flash game
Category: Massively multiplayer online game
Players: Up to 11 (Pokémon Special Tour)
Connectivity: N/A
Developer: Bascule
Publisher: Yahoo! Japan
Part of: Generation IV side series
Ratings
CERO: N/A
ESRB: N/A
ACB: N/A
OFLC: N/A
PEGI: N/A
GRAC: N/A
GSRR: N/A
Release dates
Japan: July 7, 2006
North America: N/A
Australia: N/A
Europe: N/A
South Korea: N/A
Hong Kong: N/A
Taiwan: N/A
Websites
Japanese: pokemon.kids.yahoo.co.jp (archived)
English: N/A

Pokémon Garden was originally conceived as a "web campaign" to try and regain the attention of older children that had grown out of (or "graduated" from) playing Pokémon games.

While the game was originally scheduled to close at the end of February 2007, it was re-opened due to popular demand. This new iteration would launch on August 15, 2007 with a new 4th floor, though with the requirement of a Yahoo! JAPAN ID in order to play. The game would remain open until the end of April 2009, when it closed permanently.

Features

The entirety of the game takes place in the Pokémon Garden building, which is modeled after a giant Game Boy. Players start by talking to a receptionist and selecting a Trainer class as their avatar, using graphics from the Generation III core series games.

Gameplay is controlled entirely with the mouse: players can click a location to have their character move there, and chatting with other players is performed by picking two words per message from a pre-defined list. Emotes are also available, with some first needing to be unlocked with coins.

1F - Lobby

On the first floor, players can schedule rides on the "Pokémon Special Tour" attraction at the reception desk, with a wait time of at least 2 hours. A table of available time slots is also available to view.

While waiting, players can interact with arcade machines to play single-player mini-games from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen Versions, such as Dodrio Berry Picking, or a Slot machine from the Celadon Game Corner. High scores are recorded on a high score board, with the scorer's username.

A bulletin board with Pokémon-related news is also available to view.

This floor has access to an escalator to 2F, and an elevator to 4F.

2F - Gallery

This floor has rooms themed after Kanto, Johto, and Hoenn. Each room has two floors: the first floor has a centerpiece statue of that region's starter Pokémon, while the second floor has displays where players can view game information, Pokédex data, maps, character profiles, and concept art.

This floor has access to escalators going down to 1F, and up to 3F.

3F - Game Freak Virtual Office

This floor contains the Game Freak office, where players can talk with NPCs that represent developers. Unlike other NPCs who show a versus sprite while talking to them, a developer NPC instead displays a photo of the real-life person they were based on. These NPCs give preview information about Diamond and Pearl, including silhouettes of new Pokémon.

Players can also view a database of Q&A entries, where developers answer user-submitted questions.

Two secret rooms are available: by giving secret passwords to the Super Nerd NPCs blocking a hallway, players can access the "Diamond room" or "Pearl room", each of which has a special wallpaper available for download.

This floor has access to an escalator going down to 2F.

4F - Souvenir Shop

This floor has a souvenir shop, where players can exchange points for stickers that can be placed on their Trainer Card; or for emotes that can be used when chatting. Points can be earned from the mini-games on 1F, or from playing the rock-paper-scissors battle game.

Players can sign up for the battle game on the 4th floor, with each game accepting up to 30 players. This game takes place inside giant Poké-Ball-shaped stadiums on the Pokémon Garden building's roof.

For each round of the game, the game master NPC Ryosuke will tell players the number of their opponent NPC - No.1 uses Fire, No. 2 uses Water, No. 3 uses Grass, and No. 4 uses a random type that is initially unknown. Players will have 10 seconds to choose Fire, Water, or Grass as a response. Players who fail to respond or chose a disadvantageous type would be eliminated, while players who chose an advantageous or matching type would move on to the next round. However, if the NPC opponent was No. 4, then only advantageous responses would be accepted. The game continues presenting rounds until one player remains, or all players are eliminated.

Points are earned according to the following rules:

  • 10 points per advantageous response against No. 1, 2, or 3.
  • 15 points per advantageous response against No. 4
  • 1 point for a tie against No. 1, 2, or 3
  • (10 * number of participants) points for a tie against No. 4.

Points are rewarded when a player exits the game, whether by elimination or forfeit. If a player is the last one standing, they will be interviewed before receiving their points. The responses chosen for the interview are displayed on a TV on 4F, where it can be viewed by other players.

Pokémon Special Tour

The Pokémon Special Tour is an interactive presentation for up to 11 players. Through using a time machine, two tour guide NPCs would guide players through the real-life development history of the Pokémon core series games. These tour guides had full voice acting for all of their dialogue during the tour. Tours would last approximately 30 minutes, and would take a commemorative photo of the participant group at the end.

To access a tour, players must schedule a time slot in advance on 1F's reception desk. While waiting, players are free to explore the Pokémon Garden building. Once the scheduled time arrives, players are automatically moved to the tour's viewing room.

Two versions of the tour are available. The course version must be chosen at the time of reservation.

At certain points during the tour, the time machine would malfunction, and the tour guide NPCs would instruct players on how to fix it. Players may be told to move their avatars to one side of the viewing room, matching the time portal on the screen; or to click a button in time with a spinner to generate power for the machine. The outcome of the tour's story would change depending on how players respond to these events.

References



Nintendo DS: Learn with Pokémon: Typing Adventure
Pokémon ConquestPokéPark: Fishing Rally DS
Nintendo 3DS: Pokédex 3D (Pro) • HarmoKnightPokémon Art Academy
The Thieves and the 1000 PokémonPokémon Shuffle
Nintendo Badge Arcade
Wii U: Pokkén Tournament
Nintendo Switch: Pokkén Tournament DXPokémon QuestPokémon Café ReMixPokémon UNITEPokémon TV
PC: Pokémon Project Studio Red and BluePokéROMsPokémon the Movie 2000 Adventure
Pokémon Masters ArenaPokémon PC MasterPokémon Team Turbo
Pokémon Team Rocket Blast OffPokémon Poké Ball LauncherPokémon Seek & Find
Pokémon GardenPokémon Medallion BattlePokémon Tower Battle
Mobile: PokématePokémon Say Tap?Pokédex for iOSPokémon TVCamp PokémonPokémon Jukebox
Pokémon Shuffle MobileDancing? Pokémon BandPokémon Photo BoothPokémon GOPokémon Duel
Pokémon: Magikarp JumpPokémon PlayhousePokémon QuestPokémon PassPokémon Masters EX
Pokémon Wave HelloPokémon SmilePokémon Café ReMixPokémon UNITEPokémon Sleep
Smart speakers: Pikachu Talk
Arcade: Print Club Pokémon BDance! PikachuPikachu's Great Surfing AdventurePokémon: Crayon Kids
Pokémon: Wobbuffet Fell Down!Pokémon Get Round and Round
Pokémon Tug of War Tournament: Absolutely Get Medal!Pokémon Medal World
Pokémon Card Game GachaPokémon: Battle NinePokkén TournamentPokémon Corogarena
Sega Pico: Pokémon: Catch the Numbers!
Pokémon Advanced Generation: I've Begun Hiragana and Katakana!
Pokémon Advanced Generation: Pico for Everyone Pokémon Loud Battle!
CoCoPad: Pocket Monsters Advanced Generation: Pokémon Super Drill Let's Learn Numbers from 1 to 20!!
Advanced Pico Beena: Pokémon Advanced Generation: Pokémon Number Battle!
Intellectual Training Drill Pokémon Diamond & Pearl: Letter and Number Intelligence Game
Pokémon Diamond & Pearl: Search for Pokémon! Adventure in the Maze!
Pokémon Best Wishes: Intelligence Training Pokémon Big Sports Meet!
Tech demos: Pikachu: DS Tech Demo
Self-contained: Pokémon PikachuPokémon Pikachu 2 GSPokémon Poké BallCyber Poké Ball
Cyber PokédexCyclone 2Digital Poké Ball D & PElectronic Hand-Held Yahtzee
Eevee × Tamagotchi
Pokémon game templates


  This article is part of Project Sidegames, a Bulbapedia project that aims to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon Sidegames.