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Pokémon Trading Card Game (game)

520 bytes added, 13 October
m
Overworld
 
==Plot==
The {{player}} begins their adventure at [[Mason Laboratory]], where [[Dr. Mason]] gives the player the choice of taking along one of three different Pokémon Trading Card Game decks: {{TCG|Charmander & Friends Deck|Charmander & Friends}}, {{TCG|Squirtle & Friends Deck|Squirtle & Friends}} or {{TCG|Bulbasaur & Friends Deck|Bulbasaur & Friends}}. The player character, [[Mark]], has an ambition of becoming the world's greatest Pokémon Trading Card Game player; however, Mark's rival, [[Ronald]], has a similar goal. Ronald duels the player at certain points in the game to test the player's cards; being defeated by Ronald is an indication for the player to improve his or her deck, whereas victory results in the player receiving a {{OBP|Promotional Card|GB1}}.
 
The [[player character]], [[Mark]], has an ambition of becoming the world's greatest Pokémon Trading Card Game player, but his rival, [[Ronald]], has a similar goal. Ronald duels the player at certain points in the game to test the player's cards; being defeated by Ronald is an indication for the player to improve his or her deck, whereas victory results in the player receiving a {{OBP|Promotional Card|GB1}}.
 
The object of the game is to defeat eight [[Club Master]]s (comparable to the [[Gym Leader]]s), earn their [[Master Medal]]s (comparable to [[Badge]]s), and then defeat four [[Grand Master]]s (comparable to the [[Elite Four]]) and the [[Champion]]. The Club Masters' decks correspond to the {{TCG|type}}s of Trading Card Game cards; however, because there are eight Club Masters but only seven distinct types in the game, two of the types are repeated: {{TCG|Fighting}} and {{TCG|Grass}}, split in the form of a "Rock" and a "Poison" user, respectively.
 
==Blurb==
* Duel a friend using the Game Link cable (sold separately) or generate new cards using the Infra-Red Card Pop! feature (available with Game Boy Color only).
* Basic reading skills are needed to fully enjoy the story.
 
==Connectivity==
Pokémon Trading Card Game allows players to send and receive cards and deck configurations or perform a [[Card Pop!]] between two cartridges via [[infrared]]. The Japanese cartridge has a built-in infrared feature, while the American and European versions use the infrared communications port of the [[Game Boy Color]].
 
Pokémon Trading Card Game allows players to duel each other using their own decks via the [[Game Boy]] [[Game Link Cable]].
 
Pokémon Trading Card Game cannot communicate with [[Pokémon Card GB2: Here Comes Team GR!]]. All multiplayer features are disabled in the [[Nintendo 3DS]] [[Virtual Console]] release.
 
===Card Pop!===
{{main|Card Pop!}}
Card Pop! is a two-player feature that randomly generates a card for each player. When the infrared ports of two Pokémon Trading Card Game cartridges are connected, each player will receive a random card. A player cannot Card Pop! with the same game again until both players have used the feature with so many others that their partner's ID is overwritten in both games.
 
This feature is the only way of obtaining the [[Phantom Cards]] ({{TCG ID|GB|Mew|1}} and {{TCG ID|Wizards Promo|Venusaur|13}}).
 
Card Pop! cannot be performed between Pokémon Trading Card Game and Pokémon Card GB2: Here Comes Team GR!. Attempting to do so can result in [[glitch]]es such as a [[game freeze]] or a loss of save data in Pokémon Trading Card Game.<!--even the Japanese version-->
 
==Features==
===Similarities to the core series===
[[File:Pokemon Trading Card Game.jpg|thumb|200px|The Pokémon TCG [[ROM cartridge|game cartridge]]]]
The object of the game is very similar to the object of the games in the [[core series]]: Players can start off with one of the three [[starter deck]]s, titled after (and built around) the [[starter Pokémon]] of [[Generation I]] (excluding [[Pokémon Yellow Version|Pokémon Yellow]]), {{p|Squirtle}}, {{p|Charmander}} and {{p|Bulbasaur}}. The goal of players is also to defeat eight specialized leaders, the [[Club Master]]s (comparable to [[Gym Leader]]s), and four Elite challengers, the [[Grand Master]]s (comparable to the [[Elite Four]]). However, while Club Masters' decks correspond approximately to the {{TCG|type}}s of the Trading Card Game cards, since there are eight Club Masters and at the time only seven distinct Pokémon card types, two of the types are repeated: {{TCG|Fighting}} and {{TCG|Grass}}, split in the form of a "Rock" and a "Poison" user, respectively.
 
Similar to the [[Gym]] [[Badge]]s earned by players after defeating Gym Leaders in the core series, players of Trading Card Game earn [[Master Medal]]s after defeating Club Masters. Certain Master Medals allow players to unlock corresponding [[Auto Deck Machine]]s in [[Mason Laboratory]].===Overworld===
* The "{{OBP|Deck|GB}}" option in the [[menu]] can be used the manage the player's decks. There is also a [[Deck Save Machine]] where the player can save custom deck configurations.
* The [[PC]] can be used to view a list of cards owned.
* Each [[Club]] has a Reception Center, with a Battle Center and Gift Center. The Battle Center allows dueling against other players via [[Game Link Cable]]. The Gift Center allows sending and receiving cards and deck configurations to and from other players.
* The player status screen displays the player's name, the number of non-repeated cards owned, their play time, and their [[Master Medal]]s (similar to the [[Trainer Card]] in the [[core series]] games).
* The player [[save]]s by writing on a Diary (similar to the Japanese version of the core series games, where the player writes in a [[Report]]). The player's location is displayed on the main menu before loading a save file.
* The player can run by pressing B. (This feature was later used in the core series games with the debut of the [[Running Shoes]] in {{game|Ruby and Sapphire|s}}.)
* Dr. Mason sends the player e-mails over the course of the game, sending fifteen in total. Each message contains at least one booster pack.
* There are ten [[Auto Deck Machine]]s which allow the player to build predefined decks if they have the corresponding cards. One is available from the beginning, eight require Master Medals (one Master Medal for each machine) and the other is found at the end of the game.
* There is the Challenge Cup tournament held in the [[Challenge Hall]], where the winner receives rare {{OBP|Promotional Card|GB1}}s.
 
Like the concept of the core series to store Pokémon in a [[PC]], Trading Card Game also allows players to manage their cards via computer. Players can also check their mail for messages from Dr. Mason; he will send fifteen e-mails in all over the adventure, each containing at least one booster pack.===Duels===
* The duel screen shows only one Pokémon card on each side of the field at once, displaying its name, HP, and number of {{TCG|Energy card|Energy cards}}. Additionally, the number number of cards in the deck and on the Bench are also displayed.
An* almostVarious exactcommands receptionare centerfound is also featured in Club lounges inbelow the game, with a Battle Center and a Gift Center; the former which allows players to duel against each other's decks and the latter which allows players to send or receive cards or deck configurationsscene.
* When the player wins a duel, they usually receive two {{TCG|booster pack|booster packs}}. Winning against the rival Ronald awards a {{OBP|Promotional Card|GB1}} instead.
Pokémon Trading Card Game also features the ability to run while holding the B button, an element that was not seen in the core series until {{game|Ruby and Sapphire|s}}. It also displays the player's location in the main menu before they choose to continue. On a similar note, from the Ruby and Sapphire versions onward, the save prompt can also display the player's location.
 
===Clubs===
 
Cards can be obtained through booster packs from four expansion sets including {{GB|1|Colosseum}}, {{GB|1|Evolution}}, {{GB|1|Mystery}}, and {{GB|1|Laboratory}}, or by defeating specific challengers (for example, each defeat of the Grand Masters will award the player with a set of legendary {{TCG ID|GB|Moltres|1}}, {{TCG ID|GB|Zapdos|1}}, {{TCG ID|GB|Articuno|1}}, and {{TCG ID|GB|Dragonite|1}} cards). Among the aforementioned four expansion sets is a fifth set, the {{GB|1|Promotional Card}} set. However these cards can only be attained by defeating players such as [[Ronald]], [[Tomoaki Imakuni|Imakuni?]], and the [[Grand Master]]s, defeating three [[Challenge Hall]] opponents in a row, trading with [[Ishihara]], and [[Card Pop!|Card Popping]].
 
==Connectivity==
Pokémon Trading Card Game allows players to send and receive cards and deck configurations or perform a [[Card Pop!]] between two cartridges via [[infrared]]. The Japanese cartridge has a built-in infrared feature, while the American and European versions use the infrared communications port of the [[Game Boy Color]].
 
Pokémon Trading Card Game allows players to duel each other using their own decks via the [[Game Boy]] [[Game Link Cable]].
 
Pokémon Trading Card Game cannot communicate with [[Pokémon Card GB2: Here Comes Team GR!]]. All multiplayer features are disabled in the [[Nintendo 3DS]] [[Virtual Console]] release.
 
===Card Pop!===
{{main|Card Pop!}}
Card Pop! is a two-player feature that randomly generates a card for each player. When the infrared ports of two Pokémon Trading Card Game cartridges are connected, each player will receive a random card. A player cannot Card Pop! with the same game again until both players have used the feature with so many others that their partner's ID is overwritten in both games.
 
This feature is the only way of obtaining the [[Phantom Cards]] ({{TCG ID|GB|Mew|1}} and {{TCG ID|Wizards Promo|Venusaur|13}}).
 
Card Pop! cannot be performed between Pokémon Trading Card Game and Pokémon Card GB2: Here Comes Team GR!. Attempting to do so can result in [[glitch]]es such as a [[game freeze]] or a loss of save data in Pokémon Trading Card Game.<!--even the Japanese version-->
 
==Regional differences==
 
The artwork for [[Jynx (Base Set 31)|Jynx Lv. 23]]'s face was changed from black to purple in international releases to avoid further [[Jynx (Pokémon)#Controversy|controversy]]. The background of the card was also changed from dark purple to light purple in the [[Virtual Console]] release.
{{-}}
===Virtual Console differences===
This release is locked in [[Game Boy Color]] mode; it cannot be played in [[Game Boy]] monochrome mode or with the [[Super Game Boy]] borders.
* In the American version, the two available {{p|Ninetales}} cards ([[Ninetales (Base Set 12)|the card from Base Set]] and [[Ninetales (GB 1)|the card exclusive to Game Boy]]) have their name misspelled as ''Ninetails''. However, the correct name "Ninetales" is found in the description of Base Set Ninetales's Fire Blast attack. In the European versions, the misspelled name was fixed in all languages, including English.
* In the American version, the game text is displayed in all-caps in normal play, but it is mostly internally stored in mixed case.
** In the internal game data, there are some character names of characters and Pokémon species written in all-caps, such as "[[Grand Master Courtney|Grand Master COURTNEY]]" and "{{TCG|Squirtle & Friends Deck|SQUIRTLE & Friends Deck}}", but at other times they are inconsistently stored in mixed case such as "Courtney" and "Squirtle" nonetheless.
** Some abbreviations are exceptions, shown in mixed case in all games, such as "Lv" and "No" on Pokémon cards. In Japanese and some European languages, m (meters) and kg (kilograms) are also displayed in lowercase.
** In the European versions, the game text is not only displayed, but also internally stored in all-caps.
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