Pokémon availability

Pokémon availability refers to the various means of obtaining Pokémon in the games.

Overview

In all core series games, some Pokémon may be caught and others are available via evolution. There are various methods of evolution, including by reaching a certain level, using an evolution stone, or when the Pokémon is traded. Other methods to obtain Pokémon also exist, including breeding, in-game trades, receiving them as gift Pokémon, and events. Some Pokémon may not be available in a certain game, but may be traded from another game, or transferred from an earlier generation.

From Generation I until Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, each core series game was compatible with all the Pokémon species released to date, either from the current game itself or from the available trades, transfers, and events. In Generation III, although it was initially impossible to legitimately collect all existing Pokémon due to the lack of connection with previous generations, those missing Pokémon eventually became available with new games in the same generation. However, from Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! onwards, each new core series game has a limited pool of available Pokémon.

First partner Pokémon

Main article: First partner Pokémon

The first partner Pokémon is given to the player at the start of their Pokémon journey. In most core series games, the player can choose a Fire-, Water-, or Grass-type first partner Pokémon at level 5. At least one of the player's rivals or friends also has a first partner Pokémon, which may either have a type advantage or disadvantage over the player's depending on the game.

In Pokémon Yellow and Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!, the player instead receives the Electric-type Pikachu or Normal-type Eevee as their first Pokémon.

Wild Pokémon

Main article: Wild Pokémon

The player is able to find and battle several kinds of wild Pokémon in tall grass, caves, water, etc. The wild Pokémon can be caught using a Poké Ball.

Version-exclusive Pokémon

Main article: Version-exclusive Pokémon

Some Pokémon are only found in one or two games within a particular set, to encourage trading between players. For example, between Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, Mawile appears only in Ruby, while Sableye appears only in Sapphire. Therefore, a player with Sapphire would not be able to obtain Mawile in-game and could trade with a player of Ruby to obtain one, and vice versa. Version-exclusive Pokémon usually complement each other in design, type, and location in the wild.

Mutually exclusive Pokémon

Main article: Mutually exclusive Pokémon

In some cases, there are multiple Pokémon potentially available in a single game, but the player must choose one of them or otherwise can't get them all in a single game. They include many trios of first partner Pokémon, some Fossil Pokémon and in some cases Legendary Pokémon.

For instance, the player is able to choose between Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle as their first partner Pokémon in Pokémon Red, Blue, FireRed and LeafGreen. The player may also choose one of these Pokémon as a gift given by Professor Oak in HeartGold, SoulSilver, by Professor Sycamore in Pokémon X and Y, and by Grand Oak in Pokémon HOME.

Several pairs of games have enough Pokémon to complete their regional Pokédex, except for some event-exclusive Pokémon. However, some games still may need to be restarted at least once to acquire all first partner Pokémon or other mutually exclusive Pokémon.

Permanently missable Pokémon

Main article: Permanently missable Pokémon

Some Pokémon are permanently missable. For instance, prior to Pokémon Platinum, if the player defeats a wild Pokémon that spawned from an in-game event (such as several Legendary Pokémon and other Pokémon visible in the overworld), that Pokémon becomes unavailable in the current game. In this case, no other Pokémon of the same species will appear in the current game.

Unobtainable Shiny Pokémon

Main article: List of unobtainable Shiny Pokémon

In some cases, a Pokémon cannot be legitimately obtained as Shiny. This can happen if the Pokémon cannot be Shiny in the wild or as an in-game gift (or cannot be obtained this way at all) and has never been distributed as Shiny.

Availability by generation

See also: List of Pokémon by availability

Generation I

In Generation I, there are 151 Pokémon. 150 Pokémon are available in-game and 1 Pokémon is event-exclusive (Mew).

Lickitung, Jynx, Farfetch'd, and Mr. Mime were originally exclusive to in-game trades. For this reason, until the release of later games in which they could be obtained in the wild, they could only have their traded nicknames and the Original Trainer of "TRAINER".

In this generation, the Pokédex location map does not display the Pokémon available in the Cerulean Cave. For instance, the Pokédex map claims that the location of wild Rhydon is unknown in Pokémon Red and Blue, when in fact wild Rhydon is only found in the Cerulean Cave.

It is possible to trade Pokémon with the Generation II games via the Time Capsule, which opens up breeding as an option for obtaining Pokémon.

Pokémon Red and Blue

In Japan, the original pair of releases was Pokémon Red and Green, which were followed by Pokémon Blue. International releases were called Pokémon Red and Blue but followed the availability of the Japanese Red and Green. Pokémon Red and Green together have all the available Pokémon in this generation.

Pokémon Yellow

In Pokémon Yellow, there is a single Pikachu available as the the player's first Pokémon. This Pikachu cannot evolve in the game where it was caught. However, it can evolve normally if traded to another game, and conversely, a Pikachu from another game can evolve normally in Yellow. Due to this, Raichu is unavailable in Pokémon Yellow outside of trades.

Generation II

In Generation II, there are 251 Pokémon.

  • In the Game Boy Color release, 249 Pokémon are available in-game and 2 Pokémon are event-exclusive (Mew and Celebi).
  • In the Virtual Console release, 250 Pokémon are available in-game (now including Celebi) and 1 is event-exclusive (Mew). Prior to Pokémon Crystal's Virtual Console release, Celebi was still event-exclusive.

It is possible to trade Pokémon between Generation I and II games via the Time Capsule. These Pokémon and their evolutions (if any) are available in the Generation I games, but cannot be found in Generation II outside of trades: Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle, Omanyte, Kabuto, Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres, and Mewtwo.

Pokémon Gold and Silver

In Pokémon Gold and Silver, almost all Generation II Pokémon are available without trades (except for trade evolutions) or events, other than Celebi.

Pokémon Crystal

In Pokémon Crystal, most Generation I and II Pokémon are available except for some version-exclusive Pokémon.

In the Japanese version of Pokémon Crystal for Game Boy Color, the player is able to summon a wild Celebi if they have the GS Ball that was distributed via the Mobile System GB, which was shut down in 2002. In this generation, Celebi was also distributed in other countries, by other means unrelated to the GS Ball. This changed in the Virtual Console release, where the GS Ball is found in-game (in all languages).

Generation III

In Generation III, there are 386 Pokémon. 380 Pokémon are available in the core series games, and 6 Pokémon are available by other means (Mew, Ho-Oh, Lugia, Celebi, Jirachi, and Deoxys).

There is no way to transfer Pokémon from previous generations into Generation III. However, all Pokémon from previous generations are available in the Generation III games as well.

It is possible to trade Pokémon between the core series games and the Orre-based side series games for the Nintendo GameCube (Pokémon Colosseum and XD). However, completing the National Pokédex in the core series does not require the Orre games. Almost all Pokémon found in the Orre games are also obtainable without events in the core series. Ho-Oh and Lugia are the only two exceptions, which can be obtained in the core series via the MysticTicket event or traded from the Orre games, but those two Pokémon are not required for the National Pokédex in this generation.

Espeon and Umbreon are special cases in that, not counting Colosseum or XD, they require a trade to be obtained, but do not evolve by trading. The real-time clock required for the evolution is present only in Hoenn-based games, but Eevee cannot be obtained in these games without trading it from other games.

The form of Deoxys depends on which game it is in: it is in Normal Forme in Ruby, Sapphire, Colosseum, and XD, Attack Forme in FireRed, Defense Forme in LeafGreen, and Speed Forme in Emerald. Its form cannot be changed without trading.

Unown's ? and ! forms were originally introduced in the data of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, but they were not originally found anywhere at the time of release of these games and Colosseum. Those forms were later made available in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen.

In Pokémon FireRed, LeafGreen, and Emerald, a planned Mystery Gift event would allow some Generation II Pokémon to appear in the Altering Cave (Mareep, Aipom, Pineco, Shuckle, Teddiursa, Houndour, Stantler, and Smeargle), but this event was never released. Some of these Pokémon can be found in Colosseum or XD, and they all became available elsewhere in Emerald as well.

The Nintendo DS is backwards-compatible with the Game Boy Advance games, except without any multiplayer features. Therefore, when a player uses a Nintendo DS to play the Generation III games, they are not able to trade Pokémon or connect with the GameCube.

Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald

In Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, the first 200 Pokémon from the Generation III Hoenn Pokédex are available in-game (not counting the event-exclusive Jirachi and Deoxys). Other than trades or events, there are no available Pokémon outside the Hoenn Pokédex.

In Pokémon Emerald, most Pokémon from Ruby and Sapphire are available as well (except some version-exclusive Pokémon). After the National Pokédex is obtained, there are also 33 Generation II Pokémon (almost all found in the Safari Zone). Those Generation II Pokémon are not otherwise obtainable in the core series games, although some of them can be traded from the Orre-based side series games.

In the case of the Johto first partner Pokémon, the player can receive one of their choice in Emerald after obtaining all non-event Pokémon in the Hoenn Pokédex. Wild Surskit can only appear in Emerald in a mass outbreak after record mixing with Ruby or Sapphire.

Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen

In Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, there are 195 Pokémon available in-game. This includes the first 150 Pokémon from the Generation III Kanto Pokédex (not counting the event-exclusive Mew). The other Pokémon become available after the National Pokédex is obtained: 43 Generation II Pokémon (almost all found in the Sevii Islands), and 2 Generation III Pokémon (Azurill and Wynaut).

The Mew found on the Faraway Island can only be accessed with the Old Sea Map, an event-exclusive item which was only legitimately distributed in Japan and Taiwan. However, Mew was also distributed in some other events elsewhere unrelated to the Old Sea Map and the Faraway Island.

Pokémon Channel, Colosseum, and XD: Gale of Darkness

In Pokémon Colosseum, there are 60 obtainable Pokémon outside of trades: 2 Pokémon that the player starts with (Espeon and Umbreon), 51 Shadow Pokémon, 6 evolutions of Shadow Pokémon, and the Ho-Oh from Mt. Battle. However, the 3 Shadow Pokémon found in the Card e Room (Togepi, Mareep, and Scizor) are exclusive to the Japanese version, bringing down the total to 57 obtainable Pokémon in the international versions.

In Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness, there are 130 obtainable Pokémon outside of trades: the single Pokémon that the player starts with (Eevee), 1 Eeveelution (out of 5 mutually exclusive options), 83 Shadow Pokémon, 36 evolutions of Shadow Pokémon, the 3 Johto first partner Pokémon from Mt. Battle, and the 6 evolutions of Johto first partner Pokémon.

Ho-Oh can be obtained from Mt. Battle in Pokémon Colosseum and Lugia can be caught in Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness. Jirachi can be obtained from Pokémon Channel in Europe or from the Pokémon Colosseum Bonus Disc in America, while Celebi can be obtained from the Pokémon Colosseum Bonus Disc in Japan.

Generation IV

In Generation IV, there are 493 Pokémon.

In the core series, 484 Pokémon are available in-game and 9 Pokémon are event-exclusive (Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Phione, Manaphy, Darkrai, Shaymin, and Arceus). Prior to the release of Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, Lugia and Ho-Oh were also event-exclusive. Additionally, a Manaphy Egg may be transferred from any of the three Pokémon Ranger series games, and Phione may be bred from Manaphy.

Pokémon from the Generation III games may be transferred to Generation IV via the Pal Park.

Aside from Regirock, Regice, Registeel, and Regigigas, all non-event Pokémon from Generations I–IV are available in the Generation IV games and don't require the Pal Park. A Regigigas may be caught in Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum if the player already has Regirock, Regice, and Registeel. Conversely, Regirock, Regice, and Registeel may be caught in Platinum if the player already has a fateful encounter Regigigas. The only way to obtain these Pokémon without events is to transfer the trio of legendary giants from the Generation III games via the Pal Park and use them to obtain Regigigas.

Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum

Pokémon Diamond and Pearl together have all the Pokémon from the Sinnoh Pokédex (which has 150 Pokémon in these games), aside from the event-exclusive Manaphy. Pokémon Platinum is missing some Pokémon from the Sinnoh Pokédex (which has 210 Pokémon in this game) that can be found in either Diamond or Pearl.

Spiritomb may be caught in the Hallowed Tower in Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum, but only after the player speaks with other players in the Underground at least 32 times. They need to be connected via the wireless features of the Nintendo DS. In this generation, the Pokéwalker is the only other place where Spiritomb is available.

The dual-slot mode causes some additional wild Pokémon to appear in Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum if a Game Boy Advance cartridge is inserted in the Nintendo DS system. This is not possible on the Nintendo DSi and Nintendo 3DS systems, which lack a GBA slot. However, all Pokémon available from the dual-slot mode are also available (without the dual-slot mode) in HeartGold or SoulSilver.

Origin Forme Giratina, Sky Forme Shaymin, and all appliance forms of Rotom were introduced in Platinum and are also compatible with HeartGold and SoulSilver, but they are incompatible with Diamond and Pearl.

Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver

Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver together have all the Pokémon from the Generation IV Johto Pokédex (which has 256 Pokémon in this generation), except for the event-exclusive Celebi and Mew. Alternatively, most Pokémon from the Johto Pokédex can be transferred from the Generation III games, except Ho-Oh and Lugia used to be event-exclusive in Generation III, and there are 5 new evolutions introduced to the Johto Pokédex in Generation IV.

In Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, Magnezone, Probopass, Leafeon, and Glaceon cannot be obtained via evolution since there is no special magnetic field, Moss Rock, or Ice Rock. Those evolved Pokémon are unavailable except by trading from Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum.

Spiky-eared Pichu is event-exclusive. The Pikachu-colored Pichu was a Shiny Pichu distributed via events in Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum, but if it is traded with HeartGold or SoulSilver and taken to Ilex Forest, then the player will obtain Spiky-eared Pichu. This can still occur even if Pikachu-colored Pichu evolves. The Spiky-eared Pichu is only available in HeartGold and SoulSilver and is unable to be traded or transferred to any other games. Only one Spiky-eared Pichu is available per game in HeartGold and SoulSilver.

Some Pokémon can be found through the Pokéwalker, a pedometer device that was shipped with and is able to communicate with HeartGold and SoulSilver. Some Pokémon obtained from the Pokéwalker cannot be found normally in HeartGold and SoulSilver (such as Castform, Feebas, and Wailmer). However, all Pokémon from the Pokéwalker may be normally found in multiple Generation IV games (the ones unavailable from HeartGold and SoulSilver may be found in Diamond, Pearl, or Platinum), so the Pokéwalker is not required to find any Pokémon in this generation.

Rayquaza can be caught in the Embedded Tower in HeartGold and SoulSilver, but only after the player trades with the opposite version to obtain a Kyogre or Groudon.

Generation V

In Generation V, there are 649 Pokémon.

In the core series, 636 Pokémon are available in-game and 13 Pokémon are event-exclusive (Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Deoxys, Phione, Manaphy, Darkrai, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meloetta, and Genesect). Prior to the release of Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, Zorua and Zoroark were also event-exclusive.

Pokémon from Generation IV may be transferred to Generation V via Poké Transfer (including any Pokémon previously transferred from Generation III). Some Pokémon were also available from the now-defunct Dream World.

All non-event Pokémon that cannot be obtained in Generation V without Poké Transfer may be found in Generation IV (since Generation IV includes almost all of the non-event Pokémon from the previous generations). Some Pokémon available in the Dream World are not available anywhere else in Generation V (such as Ekans and Diglett), but may be transferred from Generation IV as well.

Pokémon Black and White

Pokémon Black and White together have all the non-event Pokémon from the first version of the Unova Pokédex (which has a total of 156 Pokémon).

Landorus can be caught at the Abundant Shrine in both Black and White after the player trades with the opposite version to obtain Tornadus or Thundurus.

In Black and White, the Relocator may be used to transfer certain event Pokémon from the Generation IV games for the purpose of catching Zorua and Zoroark. Zorua becomes available if the player transfers Celebi, and Zoroark becomes available if the player transfers the Shiny Legendary beasts (Raikou, Entei, and Suicune).

Pokémon Black 2 and White 2

Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 together have all the non-event Pokémon from the second version of the Unova Pokédex (which was expanded to a total of 301 Pokémon).

White Kyurem, Black Kyurem, the Therian Forms of the Forces of Nature (Tornadus, Thundurus, and Landorus), and Resolute Form Keldeo were introduced in Black 2 and White 2, and are incompatible with Black and White. Additionally, all of these forms except for Keldeo's cannot be traded at all; due to this and the way that the DNA Splicers work, it is impossible to own both White Kyurem and Black Kyurem at the same time, and it is also impossible to own more than one Black Kyurem or more than one White Kyurem at once.

In Black 2 and White 2, Regirock, Regice and Registeel can be caught in the Underground Ruins. However, Regice only appears in Black 2 if the player receives the Iceberg Key from White 2 via Unova Link, while Registeel only appears in White 2 if the player receives the Iron Key from Black 2 via Unova Link. Regigigas can then be caught in Twist Mountain only if the player has Regirock, Regice and Registeel, so Regigigas also requires trading or using Unova Link to obtain without using Poké Transfer.

Stunky and Glameow are available via a special Funfest Mission that can only be hosted in Black 2 or White 2, respectively. However, the opposite version can still obtain the other Pokémon by joining the Funfest Mission.

Certain Pokémon that can be caught in Black 2 and White 2 are found only in the Nature Preserve, which is only accessible by seeing all non-event Pokémon in the New Unova Pokédex (most notably, Magikarp and Gyarados, otherwise available only by purchasing a Magikarp from the Magikarp salesman, are available to catch at the Nature Preserve). Accessing the Nature Preserve requires trading, as it is impossible to see all stages of whichever first partner Pokémon was not picked by the player nor by Hugh, as well as some of the version-exclusive Pokémon not being used by any NPC Trainers.

Generation VI

In Generation VI, there are 721 Pokémon.

In the core series, 706 Pokémon are available in-game and 15 Pokémon are event-exclusive (Mew, Celebi, Jirachi, Phione, Manaphy, Darkrai, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meloetta, Genesect, Diancie, Hoopa, and Volcanion). Prior to the release of Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, Deoxys was also event-exclusive.

Pokémon from Generation V can be transferred one-way to the Pokémon Bank via the Poké Transporter (including any Pokémon previously transferred from Generations III and IV). Once in Pokémon Bank, these Pokémon can be withdrawn to the Generation VI games. However, Pokémon that have been in a Generation VII game and or that were sent from the Virtual Console releases of the Generation I and II games cannot be withdrawn to Generation VI.

All non-event Pokémon from Generations I–VI may be found in Generation VI without requiring use of Pokémon Bank. However, in the Generation VI games, Deerling and Sawsbuck may only be found in their Spring Form. Other forms can only be obtained by transferring them from the Generation V games.

Pokémon X and Y

Pokémon X and Y together have all the non-event Pokémon from the three Kalos Pokédexes (which have a total of 457 Pokémon; most are from previous generations, though all Generation VI Pokémon are found in the Kalos Pokédexes).

In Pokémon X and Y, several Pokémon are available from the Friend Safari, which contains various areas that are unlocked based on the friends registered on the player's Nintendo 3DS. However, all Pokémon found in the Friend Safari are also available elsewhere in X, Y, Omega Ruby, or Alpha Sapphire.

Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire

Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire together have all the non-event Pokémon from the Generation VI Hoenn Pokédex (which has 211 Pokémon; all of them are from previous generations) and several other Pokémon as well.

Some Mega Evolutions, Primal Reversion, the Cosplay Pikachu, and Hoopa Unbound were introduced in Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, and are incompatible with Pokémon X and Y. Only one Cosplay Pikachu is available per game; it is unable to evolve, and it cannot be traded or transferred to any other games.

In Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, several Pokémon can be found in the Mirage spots, which may appear and disappear and are accessible by soaring in the sky. Some Mirage spots contain a Legendary Pokémon from a previous generation, and appear if the player meets a certain condition (such as having certain Pokémon in their party, or having any level 100 Pokémon in their party). There are also 32 daily Mirage spots that contain multiple non-Legendary Pokémon. Only one daily Mirage spot appears on each day, unless the player receives additional Mirage spots via StreetPass.

Friend Safari and Mirage spots

In the Generation VI games, the Pokémon below (and their evolutionary families, via evolution or breeding) can only be found in the Friend SafariXY and in the random daily Mirage spotsORAS. They may or may not be available at a certain point in time, until the player waits for the correct day, receives the correct Mirage spot via StreetPass, or unlocks the correct area in the Friend Safari.

Available in both the Friend Safari and the daily Mirage spots:

Available in the daily Mirage spots but not in the Friend Safari:

Generation VII

In Generation VII, there are 809 Pokémon. Prior to Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!, there were 807 Pokémon. Prior to Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, there were 802 Pokémon. There are also 18 Alolan forms available in all games of this generation.

Pokémon Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon

In Pokémon Sun and Moon, 786 Pokémon are available in-game and 16 Pokémon are event-exclusive (Mew, Jirachi, Phione, Manaphy, Darkrai, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Keldeo, Meloetta, Genesect, Diancie, Hoopa, Volcanion, Magearna, and Marshadow).

In Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, some new Pokémon species and forms were introduced which are incompatible with Sun and Moon. 790 Pokémon are available in-game (the same as in Sun and Moon, with the additions of Poipole, Naganadel, Stakataka, and Blacephalon) and 17 Pokémon are event-exclusive (the same as in Sun and Moon, with the addition of Zeraora). The Dusk Mane, Dawn Wings, and Ultra forms of Necrozma, as well as the event-only Partner Cap Pikachu and Dusk Form Lycanroc were introduced in Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon as well.

Celebi used to be event-exclusive as well in Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon prior to the Virtual Console release of Pokémon Crystal.

Pokémon Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon are compatible with the Pokémon Bank. This allows the one-way transfer of Pokémon from earlier generations into these games (since the Generation VI games are also compatible with the Pokémon Bank, while the Generation V games and the Virtual Console version of Generation I and II games can use the Poké Transporter).

Sun and Moon together, as well as Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon together, have all the non-event Pokémon from the Alola Pokédex (which has 302 Pokémon in the first pair of games and was expanded to 403 Pokémon in the second pair of games). Some Pokémon outside the Alola Pokédex are also available in-game, but several other Pokémon from previous generations cannot be found in Sun, Moon, Ultra Sun, and Ultra Moon, except by being transferred from earlier generations.

The Spring Form of Deerling and Sawsbuck can be transferred from Generation VI games while the other forms of both Pokémon can be transferred from Generation V games.

Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!

In Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!, the first 150 Pokémon from the Kanto Pokédex are available in-game (including their Alolan forms), and 3 additional Pokémon are available by other means: Mew by getting it from the Poké Ball Plus and Meltan and Melmetal by transferring them from Pokémon GO via the GO Park. This pair of games is incompatible with all other Pokémon, the first core series games to do so, starting a trend that continued for all subsequent releases.

The partner Pikachu and partner Eevee are exclusive to Let's Go, Pikachu! and Eevee!, respectively. Each game has only one partner Pikachu or Eevee; it cannot evolve, and it cannot be traded or transferred to other games. However, regular Pikachu and Eevee are available in both games.

The games are incompatible with Pokémon Bank, but were later supported by Pokémon HOME.

Generation VIII

In Generation VIII, there are 905 Pokémon. When Pokémon Sword and Shield were initially released, there were 890 Pokémon; 3 more debuted in The Isle of Armor (including the event-exclusive Zarude), 5 more debuted in The Crown Tundra, and the remaining 7 debuted in Pokémon Legends: Arceus.

No games in this generation feature every Pokémon. Pokémon HOME, an application for storing and transferring Pokémon, is compatible with all 905 Pokémon; however, the games themselves are incompatible with certain Pokémon. These incompatible Pokémon cannot be obtained in the games in any way, including via transfer.

Pokémon in Pokémon Bank, including those transferred from previous generations, can be transferred to Pokémon HOME. Pokémon from Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! can also be deposited into Pokémon HOME, and since November 10, 2020, it has been possible for Pokémon from Pokémon GO to be transferred into Pokémon HOME via the GO Transporter. Additionally, some Pokémon have been directly distributed in Pokémon HOME, either as events or rewards for certain actions; most notably, the Original Color Magearna is obtainable in HOME as a reward for completion of the National Pokédex, which is the only way to obtain it, though it can only be obtained with events due to the fact that some of the Pokémon in the National Pokédex are event-exclusive.

Once in HOME, if a Pokémon is compatible with a Generation VIII game, it can be moved to that game. Additionally, Pokémon can be moved from Generation VIII games into HOME, allowing them to be exchanged between all of the generation's games. However, if a Legendary or Mythical Pokémon (besides Meltan or Melmetal) is transferred to HOME from Pokémon GO, then it cannot be deposited into a game unless the player has already obtained one of its species in that game. Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl and Pokémon Legends: Arceus were not compatible with Pokémon HOME until the Version 2.0.0 update, released on May 18, 2022.

Pokémon Sword and Shield

Pokémon Sword and Shield are compatible with 664 Pokémon. Of these, 656 are available in-game and 8 are event-exclusive (Victini, Genesect, Diancie, Volcanion, Magearna, Marshadow, Zeraora, and Zarude). Prior to the release of The Crown Tundra, Keldeo was also event-exclusive; prior to Pokémon HOME becoming compatible with Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl, Mew and Jirachi were also event-exclusive.

  • At first, only 401 Pokémon were obtainable, consisting of the 400 Pokémon from the Galar Pokédex and Mew from the Poké Ball Plus. Sword and Shield together have all 400 Pokémon in the Galar Pokédex.
  • In version 1.1.0 of the games, Galarian Slowpoke was added and made available to catch at Wedgehurst Station, increasing the total number of obtainable Pokémon to 402.
  • Ahead of the release of Pokémon HOME, 6 additional Pokémon (the Bulbasaur and Squirtle lines) were made available in event Max Raid Battles, raising the total to 408.
  • Upon the release of Pokémon HOME, 34 additional Pokémon were made available via transfer from previous generations (including the event-exclusive Jirachi, Keldeo, Marshadow, and Zeraora), bringing the total number of obtainable Pokémon to 436.
  • In version 1.2.0 of the games, with the release of The Isle of Armor, 103 additional Pokémon (including the event-exclusive Zarude) not present in the Galar Pokédex became available as part of a new Isle of Armor Pokédex, and Magearna was made available via Pokémon HOME (albeit as an event-exclusive Pokémon), bringing the total number of obtainable Pokémon to 540. Additionally, 15 Pokémon that were previously exclusive to transfer from previous generations were made available through other means. With The Isle of Armor, Sword and Shield together have all 211 Pokémon from the Isle of Armor Pokédex except for the event-exclusive Zarude, and also have Rowlet, Litten, Popplio, and their evolutionary families.
  • In version 1.3.0 of the games, with the release of The Crown Tundra, 124 additional Pokémon (including the event-exclusive Victini, Genesect, Diancie, and Volcanion) present in neither the Galar Pokédex nor the Isle of Armor Pokédex became obtainable, bringing the total to 664. Of these newly available Pokémon, 71 became available as part of a new Crown Tundra Pokédex. Additionally, 13 Pokémon that were previously exclusive to transfer from previous generations were made available through other means (including Keldeo, thus making it no longer event-exclusive). With The Crown Tundra, Sword and Shield together have all 210 Pokémon in the Crown Tundra Pokédex, as well as 59 others.

In total, Pokémon Sword and Shield together, including the Pokémon Sword and Shield Expansion Pass, have 651 Pokémon, consisting of all of the Pokémon in the Galar, Isle of Armor, and Crown Tundra Pokédexes, besides the event-exclusive Zarude, and 68 others not in any of the three Pokédexes. The games are also compatible with 13 additional Pokémon (all of which are Mythical Pokémon) that are only obtainable via events or transferring them from other games: Mew (which is also available via the Poké Ball Plus), Celebi, Jirachi, Victini, Genesect, Diancie, Volcanion, Magearna, Marshadow, Zeraora, Meltan, Melmetal, and Zarude (which is the only one of the 13 not obtainable via transfer from a previous generation). None of these are in any of the three Pokédexes in the games except Zarude, which is in the Isle of Armor Pokédex.

Pokémon Sword and Shield are also compatible with Galarian and Alolan forms. They feature all 19 Galarian forms, but due to some Pokémon with Alolan forms not being featured in the games, only 11 out of the 18 Alolan forms are present. All Alolan forms (that exist in the games) and original forms of Pokémon with Galarian forms are obtainable without requiring transfer from previous generations, though most require the Expansion Pass to obtain in this way.

  • At first, 13 Galarian forms and no Alolan forms were available. Additionally, the original forms of Meowth, Yamask, and Mr. Mime are obtainable via in-game trades.
  • Galarian Slowpoke was added and made available to catch at Wedgehurst Station in the version 1.1.0 update. However, it was initially unable to evolve.
  • Upon the release of Pokémon HOME, the Alolan forms of Raichu, Vulpix, Ninetales, Diglett, Dugtrio, Meowth, and Persian became available via transfer from previous games. Additionally, the original forms of all Pokémon with Galarian forms became available via transfer as well, with the exception of Slowpoke, which was unable to be transferred.
  • With the release of The Isle of Armor, due to the additions of Sandshrew, Sandslash, Exeggutor, and Marowak, the Alolan forms of each have become available via transfer. Additionally, Slowpoke's original form was made available to transfer, as well as the rest of the Slowpoke line, and Galarian Slowpoke was made available to catch outside of Wedgehurst Station. Galarian Slowbro was also added, with Galarian Slowpoke now being able to evolve into it.
    • The Isle of Armor also introduces an NPC named Regina, who appears in random locations on the Isle of Armor and will trade Alolan forms to the player in exchange for their original forms, or will trade the original forms of Pokémon in exchange for their Galarian forms. After she has been traded with, she will relocate to another position on the island and be available for another trade; it is possible for her to repeat the same trade an indefinite number of times. From Regina, the original forms of Meowth, Ponyta, Farfetch'd, Weezing, Mr. Mime, Corsola, Zigzagoon, Darumaka, and Stunfisk and the Alolan forms of Exeggutor and Marowak can be obtained without requiring transfer (as can the original forms of Rapidash, Linoone, and Darmanitan via evolution). However, trades for Farfetch'd and Darumaka are exclusive to Pokémon Sword, while trades for Ponyta and Corsola are exclusive to Pokémon Shield.
    • The Isle of Armor also features a Diglett Trainer who owns 151 Alolan Diglett that are scattered throughout the island. The player is tasked with finding these Diglett, and the Trainer will reward them with Pokémon, most of which are Alolan forms, when they reach certain milestones. From this Diglett Trainer, the following forms of Pokémon are obtainable without requiring transfer: Alolan Meowth (after finding 5 Diglett), regular Slowpoke (after finding 10 Diglett), Alolan Vulpix (after finding 20 Diglett), Alolan Sandshrew (after finding 30 Diglett), Alolan Raichu (after finding 40 Diglett), Alolan Marowak (after finding 50 Diglett), Alolan Exeggutor (after finding 75 Diglett), and Alolan Diglett (after finding all 151 Diglett). By evolving these Pokémon, the Alolan forms of Persian, Ninetales, Sandslash and Dugtrio and the original forms of Slowbro and Slowking are also obtainable.
  • With the release of The Crown Tundra, the Galarian forms of Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres became available, as did their original forms via transfer. However, it is also possible to obtain the original forms of Articuno, Zapdos and Moltres without having to transfer them, as they are among the available Legendary Pokémon in Dynamax Adventures. Galarian Slowking was also added, with Galarian Slowpoke now being able to evolve into it.

Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl

Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl are compatible with 493 Pokémon, consisting of every Pokémon from the first four generations, as in the original Pokémon Diamond and Pearl.

Pokémon Legends: Arceus

Pokémon Legends: Arceus is compatible with 242 Pokémon. This includes all Pokémon that debuted in Generation IV.

All 242 are obtainable in-game. Most are repeatedly catchable in one or more of the 5 main areas: Obsidian Fieldlands, Crimson Mirelands, Cobalt Coastlands, Coronet Highlands, and Alabaster Icelands.

  • Furthermore, obtaining Spiritomb requires collecting all wisps first (20 in each main area and 7 in Jubilife Village); and obtaining more Unown requires catching a single specimen of each form first (5 in each main area and 3 in Jubilife Village). The player can also only obtain one Hisuian first partner Pokémon in-game until completion of the main story.
Variant availability

In total, Pokémon Legends: Arceus is compatible with 369 forms, including all 17 new Hisuian forms. All Hisuian forms replace their original forms, except in the case of Sneasel, where both forms are included. 242 forms make up unique species, with an additional 59 forms being the result of gender differences. In addition to this, there are a further 27 Unown, 5 Rotom, 2 Burmy and 2 Wormadam forms; and a further 6 forms accounted by West/East Sea Shellos and Gastrodon, Alolan/Original Vulpix and Ninetales, Hisuian/Original Sneasel, and Overcast/Sunshine Cherrim. The remaining 26 forms, not yet counted, consist of 18 separate Arceus forms, as well as alternate forms for Tornadus, Thundurus, Landorus, Enamorus, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina and Shaymin. Cherrim cannot appear in its Sunshine form when stored and Legend Plate Arceus appears as Blank Plate Arceus when stored. Legend Plate Arceus also does not count as a separate form entry in the Pokédex. Heights and weights for gender differences, except Basculegion, are not recorded separately in the Pokédex. Not included in the 369 total, are 2 additional Mothim forms, only separated internally, which are a result of evolution from either Plant, Sandy or Trash Cloak Burmy.

All forms can be obtained as alpha Pokémon except Alolan Vulpix, Alolan Ninetales, and those of the 18 in-game Legendary and Mythical Pokémon, totaling 46 forms excluded. All alpha Pokémon are the largest possible specimens for their species except Gyarados, Onix, Steelix, Rhyperior and Hisuian Avalugg. Only one Alolan Vulpix (or Alolan Ninetales), and only one of each of the in-game Legendary and Mythical Pokémon (except Phione) can be obtained (and only in their average size) without transferring.

All forms and their alpha equivalents can be Shiny; however, Alolan Vulpix, Alolan Ninetales, and the in-game Legendary and Mythical Pokémon are Shiny-locked and thus cannot be obtained Shiny without transferring them into the game. Shiny Enamorus is not currently legally obtainable as a result. Additionally, several in-game event Pokémon are Shiny-locked, but can be captured in the wild Shiny.

A selection of Pokémon can only be obtained in-game via rare spawns in space-time distortions, making their alpha, in-game Shiny, and Shiny alpha forms generally considered the rarest to collect in the game. These rare Pokémon are the original forms of Sneasel and Weavile (in Obsidian Fieldlands); Porygon, Porygon2 and Porygon-Z (in Crimson Mirelands); Magnemite and Magneton (in Cobalt Coastlands); and Shieldon, Bastiodon, Cranidos, and Rampardos (in Coronet Highlands). In addition, alpha and Shiny alpha Magnezone can only be obtained by catching (or evolving from) a rare space-time distortion spawn. Two similiarly rare categories are Pokémon obtained exclusively from shaking trees, namely Burmy and Wormadam; and female specimens of a species with a 7-male-to-1-female ratio, including the visibly gender different Eevee and Combee.

A total of 519 gender-form combinations (including Sunshine Cherrim and Legend Plate Arceus) are possible. 201 species, and 209 out of 310 forms (excluding gender differences), can be both female and male, amounting to 418 combinations after doubling. The remaining combinations are from 101 single gender forms across 41 species, further divided into 24 gender unknown species (Unown, the Porygon line, the Magnemite line, the Hisuian Voltorb line, the Bronzor line, Rotom, Uxie, Mesprit, Azelf, Regigigas, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina, Arceus, Phione, Manaphy, Shaymin and Darkrai) with a total of 78 forms; 7 male-only species (Mothim, Gallade, Rufflet, Hisuian Braviary, Tornadus, Thundurus and Landorus) with a total of 10 forms; and 10 female-only species (Wormadam, Vespiquen, Happiny, Chansey, Blissey, Petilil, Lilligant, Froslass, Cresselia and Enamorus) with a total of 13 forms. For alphas, there are a total of 470 combinations, 49 less combinations, which consists of 46 less alpha forms for one gender and 3 less alpha forms (Alolan Vulpix, Alolan Ninetales, and Heatran) for the opposite gender.

Availability by Area

In the Obsidian Fieldlands section of the Hisui Pokédex, 85 species are listed, including the Legendary Pokémon Mesprit and Landorus. Notably, 2 of these listed (Togepi and Togetic) are not obtainable from the area, however Togekiss is. A further 22 unlisted species for the area are actually obtainable from it: 1 of these (Hisuian Qwilfish) can be found near Ramanas Island, 10 (Toxicroak, Ursaring, Onix, Steelix, Lickitung, Lickilicky, Haunter, Gengar, original Sneasel and Weavile) inside space-time distortions, 5 (Spheal, Sealeo, Chatot, Zorua and Zoroark) during massive mass outbreaks, 3 (Overqwil, Ursaluna and Walrein) only via evolution, and the final 3 (Unown, alpha Goodra and Shaymin) only via in-game events. For the 105 obtainable species in Obsidian Fieldlands, there are 41 additional forms in total—34 of these are the result of gender differences, 4 of these are other Unown forms and 3 species (Cherrim, Shaymin and Landorus) each have one extra form. The West Sea Shellos and Gastrodon forms, as well as the Plant Cloak Burmy and Wormadam forms, are exclusive to this area.

In the Crimson Mirelands section of the Hisui Pokédex, 75 species are listed, including the Legendary Pokémon Azelf and Enamorus. A total of 35 unlisted species for the area are also obtainable: 13 (Luxio, Luxray, Eevee, Flareon, Umbreon, Drifblim, Floatzel, Snorlax, Lopunny, Heracross and the Porygon line) inside space-time distortions, 2 (Happiny and Chansey) in mass outbreaks in Cottonsedge Prairie, 6 (Skorupi, Drapion, Bronzor, Bronzong, Swinub and Piloswine) during massive mass outbreaks only, 3 (Cyndaquil, Quilava, Hisuian Typhlosion) unlockable in space-time distortions in addition to during massive mass outbreaks, 8 (Vaporeon, Jolteon, Espeon, Leafeon, Glaceon, Sylveon, Blissey and Mamoswine) only via evolution, 2 (Spiritomb and Unown) in-game-event-unlockable, and 1 (alpha Overqwil) only via an in-game event. For the 110 obtainable species in Crimson Mirelands, there are a total of 60 additional forms—31 of these are due to gender differences, 27 are Unown forms, and 2 are forms of Cherrim and Enamorus. The Sandy Cloak forms of Burmy and Wormadam are obtainable in this area.

In the Cobalt Coastlands section of the Hisui Pokédex, 96 species are listed, including the Legendary Pokémon Heatran and Thundurus. 6 (Bidoof, Wurmple, Silcoon, Cascoon, Pichu and Croagunk) are not obtainable from the area. 21 unlisted species for the area are actually obtainable: 10 (Kadabra, Alakazam, Mr. Mime, Carnivine, Skuntank, Rhydon, Rhyperior, Magnemite, Magneton and Magnezone) inside space-time distortions, 6 (Onix, Steelix, Cleffa, Clefairy, Riolu and Lucario) during massive mass outbreaks, 1 (Clefable) only via evolution, 1 (Phione) only in-game-event-unlockable, and 3 (Unown, Giratina and Manaphy) which are in-game event only. For the 111 obtainable species in Cobalt Coastlands, a total of 34 additional forms are present—28 are due to gender differences, 4 are other Unown forms and the remaining 2 are alternate formes for Giratina and Thundurus. The East Sea forms of Shellos and Gastrodon are exclusive to this area, and the Trash Cloak Burmy and Wormadam forms are also obtainable here.

In the Coronet Highlands section of the Hisui Pokédex, 90 species are listed, including the Legendary Pokémon Cresselia. 3 (Magnemite, Magneton and Weavile) are not obtainable from the area. 38 unlisted Pokémon for the area are actually obtainable: 12 (Eevee, Jolteon, Sylveon, Ambipom, Octillery, Drapion, Magmar, Magmortar, the Cranidos line and the Shieldon line) inside space-time distortions, 9 (Ponyta, Rapidash, Happiny, Chansey, Mime Jr., Mr. Mime, Duskull, Snover and Abomasnow) during massive mass outbreaks only, 2 (Dusclops and Dusknoir) in space-time distortions and during massive mass outbreaks, 3 (Rowlet, Dartrix, Hisuian Decidueye) unlockable in space-time distortions and during massive mass outbreaks, 7 (Vaporeon, Flareon, Espeon, Umbreon, Leafeon, Glaceon and Blissey) only via evolution, and 5 (Unown, Dialga, Palkia, Arceus and Darkrai) only via in-game events. For the 125 obtainable species in Coronet Highlands, there are a total of 63 additional forms—33 are due to gender differences, 18 are other Arceus formes, 5 are other Rotom forms, 4 are other Unown forms, and 3 species (Cherrim, Dialga and Palkia) each have one extra form. The Sandy Cloak forms of Burmy and Wormadam are obtainable in this area.

In the Alabaster Icelands section of the Hisui Pokédex, 91 species are listed, including the Legendary Pokémon Uxie, Regigigas and Tornadus. 2 (Geodude, Weavile) are not obtainable from the area. 18 unlisted Pokémon for the area are actually obtainable: 8 (Rapidash, Pikachu, Raichu, Scyther, Scizor, Tangrowth, Sealeo and Walrein) inside space-time distortions, 3 (Oshawott, Dewott and Hisuian Samurott) unlockable in space-time distortions and during massive mass outbreaks, 4 (Vulpix, Ninetales, Magby and Magmar) during massive mass outbreaks only, 2 (Magmortar, and Kleavor) via evolution only, and 1 (Unown) only via in-game events. The species total counts the original (Kantonian) Vulpix and Ninetales; Alolan Vulpix and Ninetales are obtained by an in-game event and evolution respectively. For the 107 obtainable species in Alabaster Icelands, a total of 31 additional forms are present—24 are due to gender differences, 4 are other Unown forms, and 3 are one extra form each of Vulpix, Ninetales and Tornadus. The Trash Cloak forms of Burmy and Wormadam are obtainable in this area.

Level Availability

All but 17 Pokémon can be obtained in-game at Level 50 or below. These exceptions consist of Spiritomb and all Legendary and Mythical Pokémon apart from Manaphy and Phione. Spiritomb is obtainable at Level 60 or above, Dialga and Palkia at Level 65, Arceus at Level 75, and the rest of the Legendary and Mythical Pokémon (apart from Manaphy and Phione) at level 70. On the other hand, Manaphy is obtained at Level 50 and Phione between Levels 33 and 36. Although Hisuian Braviary only evolves from Rufflet at Level 54 and above, the flying spawn at Lake Acuity can be caught at Level 49.

The highest level a Pokémon can be obtained at (without leveling up) is Level 91—this is an alpha Hisuian Typhlosion found inside a Crimson Mirelands space-time distortion. Alpha Pokémon are encountered at higher levels (+15 or +20) than their non-alpha counterparts within the same area.

Level 1 Pokémon cannot be obtained except via transferring from Pokémon HOME. This is because no breeding is present in the game, and the fact the lowest level wild Pokémon, such as Bidoof and Starly, are only encountered at Level 2 or above.

Pokémon HOME Interaction

Following the introduction of Pokémon HOME compatibility, the ability to transfer alpha Pokémon to other Generation VIII games became available. A consequence of this is an alpha Pokémon can be evolved into a different regional form (or species) not compatible with Pokémon Legends: Arceus, giving rise to 9 HOME-exclusive alpha forms: the original forms of Typhlosion, Lilligant, Braviary, Sliggoo, Goodra, Avalugg, Decidueye; the Galarian form of Mr. Mime; and Mr. Rime. A 10th HOME-exclusive alpha form became available following the Pokémon Scarlet and Violet-HOME compatibility update: the original form of Samurott; however, the alpha icon no longer displays for the HOME-exclusive alphas. Instead, an alpha mark is obtained if any alpha is transferred to Scarlet and Violet. All HOME-exclusive alpha forms except the Galarian form of Mr. Mime and Mr. Rime can be transferred and therefore obtain the alpha mark.

Before Pokémon Scarlet and Violet received integration with Pokémon HOME in HOME v3.0.0, Pokémon originating from Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon or earlier that were then transferred into Legends: Arceus (via Pokémon Bank and HOME) received minimum heights and weights (scalar values of 0, as prior to Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! distinct values for height and weight were not generated); following the update, randomized heights and weights will be assigned to them instead, provided they haven't been assigned a size already by being transferred to another Generation VIII or IX game.

In Pokémon GO, as part of its size variation mechanic, XXS and XXL Pokémon each have a 1 in 250 chance to be generated. When one of these extreme-sized Pokémon is obtained and transferred to Pokémon HOME and then into Pokémon Legends: Arceus, both its height and weight scalar values are set to either 0 or 255, depending on whether it was initially XXS or XXL, respectively. This results in the specimen having the minimum or maximum possible in-game height and weight for its species (or form). In contrast, generation of both of these values for a native Pokémon in Legends: Arceus has less than a 1 in 250 million chance to occur—albeit due to a lack of display precision, additional values may also give the minimum and maximum possible measurements depending on the Pokémon species/form.

Generation IX

In Generation IX, there are 1025 Pokémon, but not all of them are obtainable.

Pokémon Scarlet and Violet

Pokémon Scarlet and Violet are compatible with 733 Pokémon. Of these, 692 are available in-game, 5 are event-exclusive (Diancie, Hoopa, Volcanion, Zarude, and Pecharunt), and the remaining 36 are only obtainable by transferring from Pokémon HOME or through limited-time Tera Raids or other events.

See also


  This game-related article is part of Project Games, a Bulbapedia project that aims to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon games.