Appendix:Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky walkthrough/Chapter 5

Main Room

Once you enter the main room, instead of the usual morning cheer, Chatot gives grave news to the guild members--a Time Gear has been stolen at Treeshroud Forest! Everyone panics, but Chatot says they all need to stop and go on to their work. The game then stops again to let the player walk around a bit, however Chatot comes again shortly afterward. He tells you about your first official exploration, causing your partner to get overexcited. Once you go upstairs, Chimecho will call you over and talk about how you can now recruit friends. She says some Pokémon, after you defeat them, will become impressed and want to become a team member.

Expanding Your Team

Before recruiting, let's note that accuracy and move in this game does not always correlate to main series. Thankfully, this is the first game that lets you see an approximate accuracy and power rating of a move in-game:

Stars Power Accuracy
1 Not used 29.99% or lower
2 30-49.99%
3 4 or lower 50-69.99%
4 5-9 70-79.99%
5 10-13 80-84.99%
6 14-17 85-89.99%
7 18-22 90-94.99%
8 23 or higher 95% or higher

In this game, the power of the move is an additive bonus rather than multiplicative and as such, the range of numbers is smaller (as large numbers are not as important). Here are some numbers for reference:

  • Tackle, Pound and Scratch are the three basic starter moves in main series. They all have 6 base power here, but Tackle has 95% accuracy and 30 PP, while Pound and Scratch have 90% accuracy and 27 and 28PP, respectively. This makes Tackle more accurate in this game, despite being the less accurate one in main series at the time.
  • The three "decently powerful and accurate" moves of the Fire-Electric-Ice core have 18 power/83.6% accuracy/12PP (Flamethrower), 15 power/83.6% accuracy/8PP (Ice Beam) and 18 power/73.92% accuracy/10PP (Thunderbolt).
  • The highest base power of a move is Giga Impact at 60 (but only 4PP and 80% accuracy); the strongest move where the only drawback is somewhat shaky accuracy is Thunder with 45 power, 7PP and 73% accuracy.
  • Zap Cannon has 20 power, 9PP and 61.75% accuracy, while DynamicPunc has 10 power, 13PP and 78% accuracy, giving them more PP and accuracy than in main series. Most moves in this game PP-wise tend to be in 10-19 range.
  • Focus Blast, infamous for its 70% accuracy, has 80% accuracy here (and 6PP with 25 power).
  • Certain moves, such as Dig, secretly double damage at the end of their calculation and are always marked as 8 stars power wise.

Drenched Bluff

Pokémon marked in bold can be recruited only in this one dungeon. They might be available via other methods, such as joining after completing a board mission, but these methods are not reliable.

  • Lileep. F IQ group. Doesn't learn any notable other than natural Energy Ball at postgame levels and Confuse Ray in main story (as well as the typical Bullet Seed). Notably one of the few non-Water type Pokémon that don't fly or however but can still walk on water.
  • Anorith: E IQ Group. Learns Protect naturally relatively early, then Fury Cutter (which in this game hits twice in one turn) and STAB Rock Blast. Like Lileep, it can walk on water, but unlike it, it loses that ability upon evolving.
  • Shellos (West): E IQ Group. While Sticky Hold is very niche in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon due to how losing items works, Storm Drain is very useful. It redirects all Water-type attacks in the room to the user and unlike in main series at the time, neutralizes them, making it an useful partner if your team is weak to Water moves. It also learns some useful moves early on, such as Mud Sport to weaken Electric-type attacks (being one of the few non-Ground Pokémon to learn it and thus benefit from it) or natural Water Pulse (as well as the typical Water-type TMs).
  • Chingling: B IQ group; this is the first Pokémon in an IQ group that the starters do not have access to, with B focusing mostly on support skills (most notably being the only group to have access to both Nature Gift and Pierce Hurler, the only other group with Fast Friend, as well as one of only two groups with Haggler, which improves buying/selling prices in shops by 20%). Very shallow natural movepool, with the only usable offensive moves being Astonish and Confusion, and its only notable TM moves being Shock Wave, Shadow Ball and Thunder Wave. It does get access to Levitate however, making it completely immune to Ground-type moves (some of which can become very annoying in the future). Pokémon with Levitate in this game also hover, meaning they can travel through all terrain except walls.

Mt. Bristle

  • Machop: D IQ group. No Guard in this game is very niche as it simply ignores changes to accuracy and evasion, rather than skipping the checks altogether, but Guts can still help once in a while given how many Pokémon you'll have to encounter. All offensive moves it learns are Fighting-type, but thankfully type immunities don't matter as strongly in this game. It has access to Low Kick and Karate Chop early on, which are pretty accurate and have decent amount of PP. For reference, high crit moves in this game are 30%, while normal moves are 8% (with some moves, mostly multi-hit moves, having even lower chance), as well as Focus Energy to guarantee the critical hits. Revenge in this game works like Bide, while Vital Throw simply gives status that makes user throw attackers away. It does learn some type coverage via TMs, such as Poison Jab, Dig, Rock Slide and even Flamethrower.
  • Geodude: E IQ group. Naturally learns somewhat interesting moves at main story-ish levels: Rock Blast and Rollout for STAB multi-hit moves (unfortunately Defense Curl does not boost the latter in this game), Magnitude and Earthquake for room damage (though they're risky since they hit allies as well), Selfdestruct and Explosion to inflict 40/80 fixed damage to Pokémon on opposing side within 1/2 tiles of user, while cutting HP of your side's Pokémon by half, or Rock Polish, which while not as useful as Agility due to working only on user, increases its Movement Speed by 2 stages at once, letting it run away in case things get awkward.
  • Doduo: D IQ Group. Learns Quick Attack and Fury Attack early on, eventually learns Agility. It also has access to Pursuit (which reflects physical moves in this game) and Accupressure (which in this game not only affects every ally in room, but also has surprisingly high amount of PP for what it does). Early Bird cuts the amount of sleep turns in half, which in this game can be a devastating status. Unfortunately, Run Away is a terrible ability for AI partners, and you will not be able to switch the leader Pokémon for quite a while.
  • Spinarak: F IQ group. While its early moveset isn't too interesting aside from String Shot being a projectile that slows down target (effectively being superior to Scary Face in all ways), it eventually learns Shadow Sneak, Sucker Punch, Fury Swipes, and around late main story/early postgame, even Agility and Pin Missile. Notably, it learns Psychic naturally. Insomnia is useful, given how detrimental sleep can be in this game.
  • Starly: D IQ group. Gets STAB Quick Attack and Wing Attack, which as you might have witnessed can deals ome decent damage. It eventually learns Whirlwind (which works like Roar), Aerial Ace and even Agility. Unfortunately this Pokémon family does not fly over tiles - many Pokémon that seem like they could fly do not in this game.
  • Nidorina and Nidorino: Both are pretty similar, being in C IQ group and having nearly the same TM compatibility (with only difference being Aerial Ace on Nidorina), with some decent moves such as Blizzard or Thunderbolt. Their natural movesets have some similarities: both learn Double Kick early on and Helping Hand (which in this game simply increases teammates attacking stats - and only teammates), with more notable differences being Nidorino learning Peck and Focus Energy instead of Scratch and Tail Whip, Fury Attack instead of Fury Swipes (with the latter being beter), or Horn Attack and Poison Jab instead of Bite and Crunch (with the latter helping to cover for Psychic-types).

Once you feel ready, go to Treasure Town and pick Secret Waterfall, where your mission will take place.

Near the Waterfall

When you arrive, your partner looks at the waterfall and immediately gets fearful. He/she tries to go through it, however he/she gets battered. Once your partner ask you to go, you touch the waterfall and get battered as well. However, another dizzy spell comes to you, seeing the shadow of a Pokémon jumping through the waterfall. After this, you share this piece of information with your partner, who looks fearful again, but does it because you're with them. You jump through the waterfall and find the cave you found in the dizzy spell. You and your partner take a look around, and then you begin exploring.


Waterfall Cave

Clearly harder than the last two levels. There are plenty of Water Pokémon here, and now that you have the power to recruit members, some may want to be part of your team.

This is the first dungeon to spawn items meant to be held: in this case, items related to attacking stats: Power Band, Special Band and Twist Band.

Pokémon Encountered

Pokémon Floors Levels Recruit Rate
  Psyduck 1-8 9-10 8.2%
  Poliwag 1-8 9-10 6.4%
  Grimer 1-8 9-10 6.4%
  Tangela 1-8 10-11 6.4%
  Wooper 1-8 10-11 8.2%
  Lotad 1-8 10-11 6.4%
  Surskit 1-8 11-12 6.4%
  Barboach 1-8 11-12 8.2%
  Whiscash 5-8 11-12 0.5%

Items

Ground

Item Floors
  2-75 Poké B1-8F
  Power Band B1-8F
  Special Band B1-8F
  Twist Band B1-8F
  5 Geo Pebble B1-8F
  Apple B1-8F
  Blue Gummi B1-8F
  Grass Gummi B1-8F
  Orange Gummi B1-8F
  White Gummi B1-8F
  Clear Gummi B1-8F
  Gray Gummi B1-8F
  Pink Gummi B1-8F
  Red Gummi B1-8F
  Yellow Gummi B1-8F
  Cheri Berry B1-8F
  Oran Berry B1-8F
  Oren Berry B1-8F
  Pecha Berry B1-8F
  Blast Seed B1-8F
  Dough Seed B1-8F
  Dropeye Seed B1-8F
  Heal Seed B1-8F
  Reviser Seed B1-8F
  Reviver Seed B1-8F
  Sleep Seed B1-8F
  Slip Seed B1-8F
  Stun Seed B1-8F
  Via Seed B1-8F
  Warp Seed B1-8F
  X-Eye Seed B1-8F
  Max Elixir B1-8F
  Mix Elixir B1-8F
  All-Hit Orb B1-8F
  Blowback Orb B1-8F
  Decoy Orb B1-8F
  Drought Orb B1-8F
  Escape Orb B1-8F
  Foe-Seal Orb B1-8F
  Luminous Orb B1-8F
  One-Shot Orb B1-8F
  Radar Orb B1-8F
  Rollcall Orb B1-8F
  Scanner Orb B1-8F
  Slumber Orb B1-8F
  Spurn Orb B1-8F
  Switcher Orb B1-8F
  Totter Orb B1-8F
  Transfer Orb B1-8F
  Warp Orb B1-8F

Kecleon Shop

This is the first dungeon to feature Kecleon shops. They might appear on a floor at random; in this case chance is 8-10% depending on the floor. You can sell items to them or purchase from them. You can steal, but they will fight you and they are by far the strongest enemy in the game, being dangerous even in late postgame at Lv. 100. Stealing from them early on requires some help from items that you don't quite have access to yet.

Item Floors
  Cheri Berry B1-8F
  Oran Berry B1-8F
  Pecha Berry B1-8F
  Rawst Berry B1-8F
  Blast Seed B1-8F
  Heal Seed B1-8F
  Reviver Seed B1-8F
  Max Elixir B1-8F
  Apple B1-8F
  Big Apple B1-8F
  Blue Gummi B1-8F
  Grass Gummi B1-8F
  Orange Gummi B1-8F
  White Gummi B1-8F
  Clear Gummi B1-8F
  Pink Gummi B1-8F
  Red Gummi B1-8F
  Yellow Gummi B1-8F
  Blowback Orb B1-8F
  Drought Orb B1-8F
  Hurl Orb B1-8F
  One-Shot Orb B1-8F
  Petrify Orb B1-8F
  Rollcall Orb B1-8F
  Warp Orb B1-8F

Deep in the Cave

Once you finish the dungeon, you are in a cave full of gems. Wow! You and your partner are so awed you forget to explore. After a while, however, your partner notices a huge gem at the end of the cave. He/she tries pulling it out, so he/she could bring it back to the guild, but no avail. He/she asks you to try, and you do, but it's the same result. However...what's this dizzy feeling?

You get another dizzy spell, witnessing the same shadow of the Pokémon that jumped through the waterfall earlier. The shadow goes up and happens to press the gem...what's happening? What's that low rumble? ...Soon, the shadow of the Pokémon gets washed away.

Meanwhile, your partner is trying to still pull it out. But then...what's this?...he/she pressed the gem! Soon, the same rumble comes up and you and your partner get washed away like the poor shadow of the Pokémon. Oh dear.

Hot Spring

You and your partner, after being washed away by the flood, land in the Hot Spring. There are a lot of Pokémon there, including a Teddiursa and a Mankey. However, there is a Torkoal who is not in the Hot Spring. The Torkoal ask where you came from, and when your partner answers, he lets you rest in the Hot Spring for a bit.

B3F

Back at the guild, you and your partner are explaining that, despite finding a huge gem at the end of the cave, could not take it back since they were washed away by a flood when you pressed the gem. Chatot said it was OK, leaving him and your partner happy. However, you are still brooding over the shadow of the Pokémon. It looked strikingly familiar. As Chatot and your partner continue to be glad, you ponder over the shadow...there's no mistaking it...that was Wigglytuff!

You mention this to your partner and Chatot, who looks alarmed. He then goes to ask Wigglytuff. A few moments later, he is back with the answer. He says that Wigglytuff indeed went to Waterfall Cave, while Wigglytuff exclaimed, "Ah, fun times! Fun! Fun!". Your partner gets to the downside since they thought they made a huge achievement. Oh well.

← Chapter 4 The Gatekeepers
Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky
walkthrough
Team Skull Chapter 6 →
  This article is part of Project Walkthroughs, a Bulbapedia project that aims to write comprehensive step-by-step guides on each Pokémon game.